emporio armani

STYLE MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2018 – COVER

COVERTMI

STYLE MAGAZINE JUNE 2018 – COVER

COVERWEB

IO DONNA SCHEMA LIBERO – LA SIGNORA IN ROSSO

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The woman in red. My first virtual contact with Maria Pia Calzone was three years ago. I took a fancy to her thanks to her character in the first season of Gomorra the Series, Imma Savastano. She had already been great in Mater Natura, where she interpreted a Neapolitan transsexual, but thanks to Gomorra she has become more popular (117k followers on Instagram and 26615 on Twitter) and protagonist of other successful movies like Io che amo solo te and Dobbiamo parlare. Style Magazine dedicated to her a portfolio signed by Toni Thorimbert. At first I was so influenced by her camorrista character that I imagined a woman as tough in real life. But Maria Pia is really sweet, actually. In this picture, taken from Cinema Italia, the great book by the photographer Simon, she plays the role of the sexy icon. She plays, because she’s ironic and funny. But, to tell the truth, she’s sexy indeed.

L’UOMO VOGUE 1987

Simplicity, naturalness and vintage taste: the distinguishive photographic feature of Koto Bolofo in a picture for the June 1987 issue of L’Uomo Vogue, a monographic issue dedicated to Hollywood. Styling Nicoletta Ferrari and Alessandro Calascibetta. Emporio Armani shorts and Superga sneakers.
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SCHEMA LIBERO UNIONI LIBERE

Free Associations. I quote the guidelines of the Gianni Versace s/s 1985 menswear collection, from the book Gianni Versace. L’abito per pensare: “Since the collection’s feature is the free matching of the garments, as in the case of the outfit shown, we give indications about the different garments and not about this specific outfit”. The matching (or styling) is one of the key strenght of a designer’s conception. Or of his fashion, when it’s represented in magazines’ shootings, and interpreted by the stylist. The combination of stripes of this tartan pattern, matched with the little contrasting polka-dots on the trousers (picture), was one of the many reference codes of Versace: geometrical prints with positive/negative effect. Ideas that, in menswear, are back again, suggested by the most fashionable brands. Ph. by Claus Wickrath for L’Uomo Vogue (1985)